124

I would push back hard on this question. An interview question is a machine designed to extract a signal from a candidate. Let's examine the parts of this machine. "The most" has already been commented on. Why is it important that the answer be the most interesting? Why are you asking the candidate to solve an optimization problem in your interview? If ...


26

To be honest, I wouldn't be able to come up with any defect in particular. If I were you, I'd rephrase my questions as situations, for example: What actions would you take if you had to reopen a defect for the fifth time? You need to retest a defect which has been resolved by a developer without any further comments or explanation. What actions would you ...


22

TL;DR: No, also it is not true for programmers. Young programmers and testers are probably worth less than experienced people. Learning how to make adaptable software is something that comes with experience. Young people tend to focus on making it work, leaving a mess for the next generation of maintainers. Why do we have so many young people on software ...


20

Following the Skeptics SE guidelines I would expect a question like yours to be accompanied by sources, otherwise it's just a collection of anecdotes. To answer your question my own experience and knowledge is the opposite, more and more companies are moving to Modern Testing or some forms of Combined Engineering where testing and quality are owned by the ...


18

In this situation - unfortunately - your best option is the slow and painful method. I've used it as a general tester, and for test automation. The way I approach this is to use these techniques: Find gaps in use cases/specifications wherever possible - Every time a tester finds a hole or an unconsidered situation in a use case, specification, or design ...


18

What I observe is that it is hard to hire good programmers who specialize in automation and the particular set of skills needed for it. The result is that you end up with either manual testers or full stack devs doing testing. All the other varieties of 'other people writing test automation' (as I term it), lead to a lot of communication and goal issues. ...


15

I am terrible at recalling names, places, restaurants, and... bugs I have investigated. I usually ask my girlfriend or my friend to give me a name of a place we have been together or an actress in a movie with have seen. That's how my brain is wired. I don't like it but I get used to it. I guess some candidates might be like that. But if you task me with ...


12

The short answer: No The longer version: Younger testers and younger developers are not more valuable than older testers and developers. The person who said that developers age badly is probably invested in having a lot of cheap labor available and willing to overwork themselves and who lack the experience to know when they are being asked to do something ...


12

I can give an example from our company which is nearly the same what you desribed. Let me shortly explain how we worked. We got two departments, one was the IT-department - which had testers (manual and automated testers) and we as business department had also testers (more epxloratory testing and manual testers). Most of our work was done twice, but ...


11

I was asked a question like this at my last interview, and it took me a bit of time to think back and come up with a good answer. This was partly due to a dearth of experience - at that time I had only held internship positions. After I read your question, I repeated the exercise, trying to come up with my favorite bug in a span of time that would be ...


10

I would say such a question might spotlight how deep the candidate understands the technologies, analyze the root-causes and is able to troubleshoot issues. As per my experience I can remember several interesting defects, but I consider them interesting because I did find the root-causes of them in code, or in environment or in human-factor etc. If a ...


10

I am just rearranging the order of your questions so that this could be answered more clearly: Is this trend specific to companies? The answer would be more product-specific, and test level-specific than the organization. Let's see automation approaches in different test levels: System testing: Critical applications Consider critical banking ...


9

Professors make this suggestion. I suspect many of them don't actually know what a QA career entails since most of the professors I know are a bit divorced from the world of business. For more information, I'd suggest reading this very similar question (Fundamental Requirements For an Entry Level QA Engineer) and my response to it. Some specific skills ...


9

The best way to help your career is to learn how to test and become very good at it. James Bach has a really good post directed at new testers, that is worth reading (lots of recommendations) and he says this about certifications: Don’t get certified. There are no respectable commercial testing certifications. If you are forced to get certified for some ...


9

Here is a set of things I would do: even though you said your current position is purely manual, I would still look for things that can be automated - this may be some types of tests, or tests for specific features, testing environment setup scripts, or just not-directly related things you do for work every day - automate something to make your and your ...


9

I don't know if I'm just too literal, but when I get asked these sort of questions, I get hung up on the word "most". It's not too hard to come with a bug, but making sure that I've never seen any bugs that were more interesting is a tall order. So my advice would be to get rid of the word "most". Also, if you're looking for general aptitude rather than ...


9

I think it's an excellent question. I think it's likely to help you understand: (a) what kind of technical challenges the interviewee is accustomed to dealing with. (Do they choose a programming problem, a human interface problem, or a systems architecture problem? Do they interpret "bug" to mean not meeting the spec, or not meeting the business ...


8

Yeah, it is possible. In theory, software engineers (including QA) can work from home. All we need is a PC terminal, an online chat tool and internet access. But there are several considerations to take: You have zero experience. This will seriously stop you from getting a job. Software professionals around me, who work from home, have all got a number ...


8

If you want to earn the most, do what earns the most, probably it is not testing, nor developing. Pursue what you like to be and enjoy. Some testers become great Directors of Quality, some become great public speakers or authors. Software testings leads to different paths, from quality to more product oriented roles or into hardcore engineering. Personally ...


7

Can any one advice me the testing role is ideal for me and how to start with please. You might wish to inquire with your current company if there is a QA position available. Internal transfers are a great way to launch a new career.


7

Oh boy! There is an interesting one. Well apart from checking all the technical skills and blah blah, I always make sure to ask or observe two things about a candidate I am about to interview. And in my opinion someone who lacks this or are weaker in these skills, blows up his/her interview or rather, reduce their chances of getting hired. As a tester, ...


7

If you aren't getting good answers, then perhaps you can modify the question slightly to help the interviewee. The word "interesting" can be interpreted in so many different ways, and perhaps that is where your candidates are getting stuck? Maybe you are looking for the "hardest to find" bug, maybe the "hardest to fix" bug, maybe the "most off the wall" ...


7

It's a great question because it separates code copiers/script kiddies from actual software engineers. Example: A well-known, very expensive piece of analytical software owned by a large company (I won't say their name, but their initials are I, B and M) would refuse to allow drill-down access to data via SSL. The company isn't going to but another service ...


7

It depends on what you mean by "through" - obviously, this is not a job board. A quick check of Stack Overflow Jobs shows that companies are hiring people for QA roles though the network, and they'd be quite silly to use Stack Overflow for hiring for a QA role without looking at the candidate's SQA profile. Outside of that, I have used my Stack Exchange ...


6

Recording tests often leads to hard to maintain tests, therefore most experienced testers prefer hand coding automated tests over recording. Automated tests often cover the same area multiple times, in order to setup data, or for example navigation. When a central part of the application changes this could result in multiple tests failing, all these tests ...


6

Try Utest.com https://www.utest.com/ or there is another that I cannot think of off the top of my head. I wouldnt rely on it for my sole income - but you are in England so might get more payable test invites through than me in New Zealand - and its all experience.


6

I think it is an appropriate question to ask in an interview. I would restructure the question as what is the most interesting bug that you or your team found and what's the lesson learned? That way it may not be just the individual who found it but he is also learning from other people in the team. I don't remember the most interesting bug I found and ...


6

Generally yes, Quality Assurance folks are paid less and have less prestigious jobs. There are definitely exceptions and usually the key today is to be as technical as possible. I know more than one Quality Engineer who is making $150k+ in the US. Your question begs me to ask Justify to whom ? To your family for how much money you earn? To yourself for ...


6

Everyone will have to stop playing sooner or later. The younger a specialist is the more effective they can follow changing technologies just because of physiological aspect. On the other side "old" specialists (I wrap old with quotes since this is pretty much subjective term) have the obvious advantage that is the experience. So if you want to be ...


6

I can think of several issues: Test automation fails if the test automation engineers are too far separated from the software engineers. In a perfect world, fully automated tests allow continuous integration and deployment. That means almost any software change requires a test change to make the tests run through if the change affects APIs, or service ...


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