17

It really depends. Actually rendering elements in a webpage/application and the webpage/application itself depends a lot on the environment it is being accessed. The environment includes, the OS, Browser, any plugins in the browser, the device screen size, the interface mode of the device, the technology you used to create the webpage/application and more. ...


8

This Stack Overflow thread suggests that there are differences and the modes are not totally accurate. Depends on your definition of risk and how accurate the results have to be for you and your stakeholders


6

Yes , I have tested a responsive site into the Different browser. In Google Chrome Browser to test the Responsive view press F12.-> Click on 'Toggle Device Mode' , Using this option we can select the different type of device mode. Another option is we can add app which is "Responsive Web Design Tester", using this on right click menu Responsive Web Design ...


6

TL DR: Establish a baseline, tinker, and react. In general developers should not worry too much about cross browser testing. Yes, it's a problem, and yes, they need to be aware of it, but I would keep it to a minimum. Let them focus on great functionality first, and not that developers shouldn't care about quality (because they totally should!) but in ...


6

Multi-device/browser testing strategy Above all else: Know your user population and the devices they use and the way they use them Determine if your focus is manual or automation testing as they have different requirements Find out what browsers, devices & versions are used by your users (server logs, new relic, etc.) Ask the business what percent of ...


4

One of the disadvantages of using SaaS for regression testing is that you need to allow outside organization access to your pre-production test environment. In most organizations, it has significant part of real production information, which can be security risk. Even if you de-identify user data (scramble addresses, phones, names etc) in pre-production ...


3

Managing multiple browser setups on a single machine sounds like a nightmare. Also I wonder how many browsers you really need to support, have a look at Browser market share per version. I think services like: https://www.browserstack.com/ https://saucelabs.com/features#features-manual-testing http://testingbot.com/ Are better suited for your browser ...


3

What you're looking for is called a javascript profiler. Most modern browsers include some kind of a profiler with their developer toolkits. Here are some links Chrome JS Profiler Firefox JS Profiler A good code profiler (JS or not) will tell you who started what function call (stack trace or call tree), how long the particular function was running and ...


3

Sadly, years of playing with emulators of one form or another has taught me a very simple lesson: There is no substitute for testing your software on it's target No matter how good a simulator or emulator you are running, there will be enough situations that the sim/em-ulator doesn't cover 100% accurately that you are leaving potential problems I've also ...


3

You can use the Selenium Webdriver itself to do it. See this answer. Just do this procedure for each page you want to check.


3

I think the general answer is "be reasonable". Just because you're doing blackbox testing doesn't mean you should do extra useless testing--in this type of situation, you're likely better off looking at how the code is implemented and deciding on the scope of testing accordingly. I've seen too many blackbox tests that were long and painful to execute but ...


3

You can search around for browser statistics over the Internet. As an example here is the stats provided by w3schools.com based on over 45 million monthly visits. NB! The table captions are clickable so that you can drill into the details of particular browser version stats.


3

The answer is that They don't test on all of the combinations They focus on the ones that are used the most For example there are literally thousands of Android devices and sizes and OS versions. So no company is testing ALL of them. Similarly, companies may agonize over testing ie6 vs ie7 vs i8 vs i9 is 2017 but none that I can imagine are still testing ...


3

There will be differences between emulators/simulators and actual devices. Android emulators just emulate the screen size and pixel ratio and run a stock version of Android. Many of the major devices run their own custom version of Android. For instance, any Samsung Galaxy runs it's own version of Android which contains Samsung software to promote people ...


3

Docker is not a virtualization platform. It is a containerization platform. It just isolates applications from each other. It might event fail to run the image that is built for one version of Linux within another version of Linux (for example 64-bit vs 32 bit). So if you need to test the back-end there is no other ways except virtualization. You can either ...


2

Have you tried having a look at Selenium or what is now called Webdriver (Selenium2)? You can use the Selenium IDE to record your tests on Firefox. However after the tests have been written they can be converted to other languages such as C#. Java. Once that is done its quite easy to get the same test to run on Internet Explorer, Chrome, Mobile browsers, ...


2

We've gone through a very similar process over the last few years and I can share some things that have worked for us. What to Test There are a lot of facets to web apps and there's a lot of benefit in testing behind-the-scenes code, but the best place to start is usually the web interface (so browser automation tests). This will help you identify where ...


2

A lot depends on what you want the front-end automation to do. Given that you've got a lot of web forms with code behind, I'd honestly consider starting with the unit test framework built into Visual Studio, and using that to test the data handling (I'd recommend taking a look at Channel9's TechEd videos for an idea of what you can do with Visual Studio ...


2

I assume your web application is for external customers (so your users can use web app in many browsers and operating systems outside of your control). Which is very interesting challenge - exactly what we are doing :-) You are excellently positioned to use new future W3C standard for browser automation, Selenium Webdriver (Se 2). (In a way, you future-...


2

Where I work, there are three web applications that need to be maintained, with a fourth (which is intended to unify all three existing applications) in development. Each has a distinct purpose: Application 1 is an enterprise-level employee and payroll management web application used by both internal payroll specialists and externally by customers. ...


2

This SO discussion recommends: using different browser versions on different accounts creating several installations of a browser


2

There are online services that provide access to older browser versions (Chrome, Firefox, IE, ...) like testingbot. To download older versions of Chrome, try this URL: http://commondatastorage.googleapis.com/chrome-unsigned/desktop-W15K3Y/$version/win/chrome-win.zip


2

This is a good question with no "right" answer as a great many factors come into play and the right answer depends on your individual situation. Factors to consider are: developer:qa ratio developer group size company size and resources amount of javascript in the application current browser usage of your software developer uniformity of local browsers ...


2

After working on this for a few hours with a colleague and doing some in-browser debugging in Safari we came to the following conclusion: The element was not visible ('below the fold') and Safari was not able to find the element to then click on. The solution was to scroll to the area of the page where the element existed by finding a nearby element ...


2

"Is it true that at the majority of companies it is not performed" Well I haven't done a survey, have you? As far as I know web development companies usually do Cross-browser Testing (C.B.T.). They have to make sure the websites and web applications they develop look and work in the same way in various browsers. This is to make sure that all users have a ...


2

Answers: No - I have seen majority of the companies do cross-browsing testing. One of the cause could be browser configuration and updation but there are lot others too involved in that. Yes - I do think one should prefer functional testing to complete and then can move towards cross-browser testing. But surely not at the start. Yes - Cross-browser testing ...


2

It depends on your specific requirements: Do your requirements demand cross browser / device testing? Some functional requirements do demand cross browser / device testing, e.g. an application needs to be logged in / out properly on all of its platforms. Some functional requirements do not demand cross browser / device testing, e.g. a legal claim link that ...


2

Exporting the tests may take care of ~90% of the task at hand. The work you'll mostly likely need to do is patch ups, such as: Calling upon the different webdrivers (Chrome, Internet Explorer) WebDriver driver = new ChromeDriver(); //as opposed to new FirefoxDriver(); Fixing brittle locators (If your tests identify elements by id, they're stable. If ...


2

I think you can use a .RunSettings as described in the MSDN documentation. <?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" ?> <RunSettings> <TestRunParameters> <Parameter name="browser" value="chrome" /> </TestRunParameters> </RunSettings> If you make a file for Firefox and Chrome you can run the tests from the command-line ...


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